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Helicobacter pylori reservoir

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has long been found to cause gastric diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. The transmission medium of this bacterium has yet to be determined, though several studies have speculated that the oral cavity is a reservoir for H. pylori Early attempts to identify non-human reservoirs for Helicobacter pylori were largely unrewarding. The one exception being old-world macaques, which were found to be colonized with H. pylori; however, it is doubtful whether this species provides an important reservoir for human infection A conceptual model of water's role as a reservoir in Helicobacter pyloritransmission: a review of the evidence N. R. BELLACK,1,*M. W. KOEHOORN,1,2Y. C. MacNAB,1and M. G. MORSHED3 1Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada 2School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canad VacA generates a protective intracellular reservoir for Helicobacter pylori that is eliminated by activation of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1 Helicobacter pylori infection is a proven carcinogen for gastric cancer. Its virulence factor vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) promotes more severe disease and gastric colonization

Oral Cavity as an Extragastric Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori. ISRN Gastroenterol. 2014 Feb 20;2014:261369. doi: 10.1155/2014/261369. eCollection 2014 H. pylori and H.hepaticus was not detected in any of the patients by PCR. CONCLUSION: There was no correlation between GI symptom and/or seropositivity of H. pylori with presence of H. pylori and H. hepaticus in adenotonsillar tissues. Our results did not support the role of adenotonsills as a reservoir for H. pylori or H. hepaticus

Should H

Helicobacter pylori and its reservoirs: A correlation with

Although the principal reservoir for H. pylori infection seems to be a human being, there may be other reservoirs of H. pylori, such as livestock. Handt et al [ 32] isolated H. pylori from cats and implied that this so called pet transmission may have public health implications Objective: Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) has been associated with the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer.Although H. pylori infects up to more than half of the world's population, to date the precise modes of transmission has not been fully understood yet. Therefore a study was planned to investigate whether the tonsils and the adenoid tissue were the reservoir or. Reservoir bugs: Study shows why stomach pathogen is so tough to eradicate. The stomach-dwelling bacteria Helicobacter pylori survives in the stomach — a hellish, churning vat of hydrochloric acid — by holing up inside that organ's pitlike glands and establishing squatter's rights

literature search was carried out to determine whether food acts a reservoir or vehicle in the transmission of H. pylori. Although growth of the pathogen should be possible in the gastrointestinal tract of all warm-blooded animals, the human stomach is its only known reservoir. Under conditions where growth is not possible, H. pylori The aim of the study was to observe the relationship between the two reservoirs of Helicobacter pylori—that is, dental plaque and the stomach.With the Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) test, H. pylori was detected in dental plaque and in gastric antral and body mucosa in 98%, 67%, and 70%, respectively, of 43 consecutive patients with dyspepsia. . The rapidity of the CLO test indicates that. H. pylori infected subjects expressed H. pylori in samples from the oral cavity. The main reservoir for infection within the oral cavity was determined to be dental pulp. Moreover, H. pylori are likely transmitted from dental caries to the root canal

VacA generates a protective intracellular reservoir for Helicobacter pylori that is eliminated by activation of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. Mariana I. Capurro 1 na1, Laura K. Greenfield. Helicobacter pylori, previously known as Campylobacter pylori, is a gram-negative, microaerophilic, spiral (helical) bacterium usually found in the stomach. Its helical shape (from which the genus name, helicobacter, derives) is thought to have evolved in order to penetrate the mucoid lining of the stomach and thereby establish infection Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium broadly distributed in the world, colonizing nearly 50% of the human population. Its niche is the human stomach, where it is able to generate several gastric pathologies. the main H. pylori reservoir for transmission of this bacterium to newborns [27] Based on the systematic review of the available literature on H. pylori infection and its presence in the oral cavity, it can be concluded that dental plaque can act as a reservoir, and proper oral hygiene maintenance is essential to prevent reinfection Besides the well established Helicobacter pylori reservoir, i.e. the human stomach, numerous other sources have been hypothesized. However, none has been definitely proven

The route of transmission of Helicobacter pylori from individual to individual remains undefined. It has recently been reported that the domestic housefly, Musca domestica, when fed pure cultures of H. pylori, was able to harbor the organism in its midgut for up to 30 h (P. Grubel, S. Hoffman, F. K. Chong, N. A. Barstein, C. Mepani, and D. R. Cave, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1300-1303, 1997. Helicobacter pylori infection plays a role in the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, yet the route of transmission into susceptible hosts remains unknown. Studies employing microbiological techniques have demonstrated that H. pylori has the ability to survive when introduced into water and that H. pylori is present in water and other environmental samples all. Introduction: Helicobacter pylori infection is very prevalent in Brazil, infecting almost 65% of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of this bacterium in the oral cavity of patients with functional dyspepsia (epigastric pain syndrome), establish the main sites of infection in the mouth, and assess the frequency of cagA and vacA genotypes of oral H. pylori Helicobacter pylori is a gram negative, spiral shaped bacterium which its main reservoir is humans, particularly the human stomach. It colonizes most of the population, making it one of the most controversial bacteria in the world that cause gastritis, peptic ulcer, duodenal ulcer, lymphoma and gastric cancer [ 1 ] Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium which causes chronic gastritis and plays important roles in peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. H. pylori has been found in the stomachs of humans in all parts of the world. In developing countries, 70 to 90% of the population carries H. pylori. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is lower. There.

Accordingly, the association between O. viverrini and H. pylori may be an obligatory mutualism. Keywords: Opisthorchis viverrini - Helicobacter - H. pylori - reservoir host - hamster RESEARCH ARTICLE The Carcinogenic Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a Reservoir for Species of Helicobacter Malgorzata Plonka, Aneta Targosz and Tomasz Brzozowski (April 3rd 2014). Can Drinking Water Serve as a Potential Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori? Evidence for Water Contamination by Helicobacter pylori, Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection, Bruna Maria Roesler, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/57568. Available from Helicobacter pylori (HP) is one of the most common gastric infections in the world, affecting about half the world's population and is the principal cause of adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach (1). The risk of developing gastric cancer is related to the different subtypes of HP and to the inflammatory response mediated by genetic factors (1) The Helicobacter pylori extra gastric reservoir is probably the oral cavity. In order to evaluate the presence of this bacterium in patients with periodontitis and suspicious microbial cultures, saliva was collected from these and non-periodontitis subjects. PCRs targeting 16S rRNA gene and a 860 bp specific region were performed, and digested.

The oral cavity- reservoir of infection with Helicobacter pylori. The oral cavity has been established as an entrance door and second ecological niche of Helicobacter pylori (HP). This question remains open - is the oral cavity a source of stomach infection or a cause of re-infection, recurrence or persistence of the infection?. Introduction. It is well documented that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is worldwide, however, the precise transmission way have not been fully determined and remains vague.Transmission via the fecal-oral and oral - oral transmission is believed as the major mechanism of H. pylori distribution (1-3). H. pylori has been detected in the oral cavity samples from supragingival. OBJECTIVE Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) has been associated with the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Although H. pylori infects up to more than half of the world's population, to date the precise modes of transmission has not been fully understood yet. Therefore a study was planned to investigate whether the tonsils and the adenoid tissue were the reservoir or the.

In the G + O + tp group, 77.3% showed eradication of gastric H. pylori compared to 47.6% in G + O + t. H. pylori eradication in the stomach and the oral cavity coincided—that is, all 16 of the individuals negative for oral H. pylori were also negative for gastric H. pylori. Five of the participants positive for oral samples were positive for. Furthermore, the reservoir concept appears to be more of a concern in persons with periodontitis, though not all studies have observed this association16 Alagl AS, Abdelsalam M, El Tantawi M, et al. Association between Helicobacter pylori gastritis and dental diseases: A cross-sectional, hospital-based study in Eastern Saudi Arabia The main reservoir for infection within the oral cavity was determined to be dental pulp. Moreover, H. pylori are likely transmitted from dental caries to the root canal. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori infection, H. pylori, Ulcer, Gastric cancer, Dental pulp, Dental caries, Dentistry Background Helicobacter pylori existed for a very long time as th Helicobacter pylori (HP) is one of the most common gastric infections in the world, affecting about half the world's population, and is the principal cause of adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach. It seems that HP infects the subject early in life and is transmitted from person to person

Helicobacter pylori, previously known as Campylobacter pylori, is a gram-negative, microaerophilic, spiral (helical) bacterium usually found in the stomach. Its helical shape (from which the genus name, helicobacter, derives) is thought to have evolved in order to penetrate the mucoid lining of the stomach and thereby establish infection. The bacterium was first identified in 1982 by. EDITOR—BMJ Updates summarises a fascinating study.1 2 It gives further support to the view that the reservoir of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque on teeth cannot be removed by systemic antimicrobials and is an important potential source of reinfection.3 The link between smoking and periodontitis has become well established over the past 20 years. . In addition to exacerbating. Besides the well established Helicobacter pylori reservoir, i.e. the human stomach, numerous other sources have been hypothesized. However, none has been definitely proven. In some instances (pig, sheep), Helicobacter species closely related but different from H. pylori were detected but the results were misleading because culture of sufficiently discriminating molecular techniques were not used

Non-human reservoirs of Helicobacter pylor

  1. Helicobacter pylori is a major bacterial pathogen involved in several gastrointestinal diseases. Transmission routes and reservoirs of H pylori are not well understood despite several studies. In contrast to many other infectious diseases, clinical symptoms allowing definitive diagnosis of infection are absent
  2. For nonhuman hosts, intestinal Helicobacter spp are thought to translocate more frequently from the colon to the liver. Within the human host, the oral cavity is the principal extragastric reservoir, although case reports suggest that H. pylori may sometimes be found beyond the 2nd part of the duodenum
  3. Introduction: Helicobacter pylori infection is very prevalent in Brazil, infecting almost 65% of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of this bacterium in the oral ca... Oral cavity is not a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori in infected patients with functional dyspepsia - Silva Rossi‐Aguiar - 2009 - Oral.
  4. Helicobacter pylori. hideout in gastric glands. Microniches within the gastric glands of the stomach house a reservoir of Helicobacter pylori, according to new research in mice. The findings.
  5. Thus bulk of the data suggests that the organism is transmitted from person to person by fecal-oral and/or oral-oral route.In 1997, Minocha et al. [11] reported a decreased risk of H. pylori infection among patients who underwent tonsillectomy, which led to an argument on whether the tonsil was a reservoir for H. pylori

A conceptual model of water's role as a reservoir in

  1. The principal reservoir of Helicobacter pylori is the human, with infection occurring mainly in childhood. Found in rhesus monkeys, certain macaque species, and in a closed colony of barrier-maintained cats. One strain was isolated from pig. Resistant to nalidixic acid, trimethoprim, sulfonamides, and vancomycin. Sensitive t
  2. The Helicobacter pylori extra gastric reservoir is probably the oral cavity. In order to evaluate the presence of this bacterium in patients with periodontitis and suspicious microbial cultures, saliva was collected from these and non-periodontitis subjects. PCRs targeting 16S rRNA gene and a 860 bp specific region were performed, and digested with the restriction enzyme DdeI
  3. H. pylori is the Helicobacter species of humans. H. pylori isolation from several other animal species (monkey, pig, cat, dog) has been reported, but these reports were anecdotal, and these bacteria were most likely acquired from humans. 1 .1 .5 Target cells and tissues The target cell of is the gastric H. pylori mucus-secreting cells
  4. The biofilms were challenged with Helicobacter pylori (NCTC 11637). Results indicate the presence of H pylori associated with the biofilm for up to 192h post-challenge, suggesting that biofilms in water distribution systems could be a possible and as yet unrecognised reservoir of H pylori. Previous article
  5. KEY ISSUES. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most prevalent chronic bacterial infection in humans, colonizing the stomach of about half the world's population.Appropriate reprocessing procedures of endoscopes is mandatory to avoid nosocomial transmission. An effective vaccine against this infectious disease, followed by the optimization of the vaccine strategy would be the best public.

VacA generates a protective intracellular reservoir for

  1. ated water; Feco- oral rout
  2. Background. Several studies were reported on the prevalence, and relationship between the existence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity and in stomach of patients. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the existin
  3. Abstract. Objective: Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) has been associated with the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Although H. pylori infects up to more than half of the world's population, to date the precise modes of transmission has not been fully understood yet
  4. Aim: The aim of current study is to investigate whether tonsillar and/or adenoid tissue of patients with chronic adenotonsillitis plays a reservoir role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) or Helicobacter hepaticus (H. hepaticus).Background: Recently, there have been arguments ragarding Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) being reserved in adenotonsillar tissue.Patients and methods: This study was.
  5. A conceptual model of water's role as a reservoir in Helicobacter pylori transmission: a review of the evidence. Epidemiol Infect 2006; 134:439. Queralt N, Bartolomé R, Araujo R. Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in human faeces and water with different levels of faecal pollution in the north-east of Spain

1. Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans [].The presence of the organism H. pylori (initially termed Campylobacter pyloridis) in the antral mucosa of humans was first reported in 1983 []. H. pylori has been closely linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma [3, 4] Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen involved in gastritis and gastric canhose mode of cer w transmission remains unknown [1]. Association of H. pylori with humans is thought to date from remote antiquity and the bacterium has apparently evolved together with the human host [2]. A fe

A conceptual model of water's role as a reservoir in Helicobacter pylori transmission: a review of the evidence. N R Bellack Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada Worldwide, gastric cancer (GC) represents the fifth cancer for incidence, and the third as cause of death in developed countries. Indeed, it resulted in more than 780,000 deaths in 2018. Helicobacter pylori appears to be responsible for the majority of these cancers. On the basis of recent studies, and either alone or combined with additional etiological factors, H. pylori is considered a. Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that causes gastric infection. It is the most well known and clinically significant species of Helicobacter.Transmission is believed to occur by ingestion of contaminated food or water; therefore, a higher prevalence of infection is seen in areas with poor sanitation

Occurrence of cagA + vacA s1a m1 i1 Helicobacter pylori in

Oral Cavity as an Extragastric Reservoir of Helicobacter

  1. PATHOGEN SAFETY DATA SHEET - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES SECTION I - INFECTIOUS AGENT. NAME: Helicobacter pylori. SYNONYM OR CROSS REFERENCE: Known as Campylobacter pylori prior to 1989 Footnote 1, chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease.. CHARACTERISTICS: The extracellular H. pylori, of the Helicobacteraceae family, are gram-negative, microaerophilic, motile, and they are the only species in.
  2. 154 Adenotonsillar tissues as a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter hepaticus Gastroenterology and Hepatology From Bed to Bench 2011;4(3): 153-158 access to an easy, sensitive, and specific method of verifying the presence of H. pylori in tonsillar tissue
  3. H. pylori is reported come from polymerase chain reaction laboratory test, but the standard for Helicobacter isolation is the culture (Koido et al., 2008). The main objective of this review was to verify if the hypothesis that dental plaque serves as a reservoir for H. pylori can be justified from the literature. Helicobacter pylori
  4. Based on the systematic review of the available literature onH. pylori infection and its presence in the oral cavity, it can be concluded that dental plaque can act as a reservoir, an Year: 2016 OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.808.180
  5. Helicobacter Pylori is typically found in the epithelial lining of the stomach or in the gastric mucous layer frequently adapting to the tough environments of the stomach. Humans are the target reservoir for this bacterium to infect. It is a spiral shaped, gram-negative bacterium that causes gastric and duodenal ulcers in the stomach

Video: The role of adenotonsillar tissues as a reservoir for

Helicobacter pylori: epidemiology and routes of transmissio

  1. g ability in the environment and on human gastric mucosa.
  2. While few new methods have been proposed for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis, there are still a number of articles evaluating the current methods and trying to improve their accuracy.. Invasive tests Endoscopy. Attempts to diagnose Helicobacter pylori infection directly during endoscopy have been made in the past. While the observation of H. pylori per se is usually not possible, indirect.
  3. The variability in Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes has been related to the progression of the gastrointestinal disease; also the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity has been associated with periodontal disease in adults, but, in children without dyspeptic symptoms, little is known about this. We evaluated the prevalence of<i> H. pylori</i> and the presence of<i> vacA</i>/<i>cagA.

Management of Helicobacter pylori infectio

Helicobacter pylori has been directly linked with active chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma in humans. Although a substantial portion of the human population is colonized with H. pylori, the patterns of transmission of the organism remain in doubt, and reservoir hosts have not been identified. This study documents the isolation of H. pylori from domestic cats. Although molecular techniques have identified Helicobacter pylori in drinking water-associated biofilms, there is a lack of studies reporting what factors affect the attachment of the bacterium to plumbing materials. Therefore, the adhesion of H. pylori suspended in distilled water to stainless steel 304 (SS304) coupons placed on tissue culture plates subjected to different environmental. Introduction This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447.

Contaminated water as a source of Helicobacter pylori

Helicobacter pylori causes gastritis duodenal ulcers stomach ulcers increased risk for stomach cancer all of the choices are correct. they both have a reservoir in the intestines of cattle they both are capable of fermenting lactose they both produce an enterotoxin called Shiga toxin Exercise 1: Disorders of Gastrointestinal Function Describe the causes and consequences of esophagitis. Discuss the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults and children. Adults Stomach acid enters esophagus and cause heartburn Reflux of acid may produce respiratory symptoms (chronic cough, wheezing, hoarseness) Children common problem, small reservoir capacity w/ frequent. A conceptual model of water's role as a reservoir in Helicobacter pylori transmission: a review of the evidence N. R. BELLACK1*, M. W. KOEHOORN112, Y. C. MAcNAB1 AND M. G. MORSHED3 1 Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada 2 School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canad

Vías de transmisión propuestas para H

Morphology and Ultrastructure - Helicobacter pylori - NCBI

The oral cavity has been suspected as an extra‐gastroduodenal reservoir for Helicobacter pylori infection and transmission, but conflicting evidence exists regarding the occurrence of H. pylori in the mouth, independently of stomach colonization. Ninety‐four gastric biopsy patients were analysed for the concurrent presence of H. pylori in the mouth and stomach Objectives: To postulate that Helicobacter pylori infection may be transmitted sexually, using the human female vagina as a reservoir for transmission. Methods: A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Biological Abstracts, and Currents Contents (January 1983 to August 2000). Relevant keywords were used and additional manual searches were made using the reference lists from the. Evidence for Water Contamination by Helicobacter pylori @inproceedings{Ponka2014CanDW, title={Can Drinking Water Serve as a Potential Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori? Evidence for Water Contamination by Helicobacter pylori}, author={M. Płonka and A. Targosz and T. Brzozowski}, year={2014} The route of transmission of Helicobacter pylori from individual to individual remains undefined. It has recently been reported that the domestic housefly, Musca domestica, when fed pure cultures of H. pylori, was able to harbor the organism in its midgut for up to 30 h (P. Grubel, S. Hoffman, F. K. Chong, N. A. Barstein, C. Mepani, and D. R. Cave, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1300-1303, 1997) Table 1: Oral Cavity as an Extragastric Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori Summary of studies in which the presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was determined by rapid urease test/CLO test

[Is dental plaque a normal Helicobacter pylori reservoir?]

Helicobacter pylori is one of the world's most common pathogens. It colonizes about 60% of the world's population, causes gastritis and peptic ulcer, and is strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. However, most individuals never develop The only significant reservoir o EDITOR—In their review of the management of Helicobacter pylori infection Harris and Misiewicz do not mention the potential reservoir of H pylori in dental plaque on teeth.1 Because this is a biofilm, no antibiotic will penetrate it, and if it carries the organism, it must be removed mechanically with oral hygiene, scaling, and root planing—exactly as for periodontal diseases caused by. Helicobacter pylori is found predominantly in human gastric mucosa. Transfer of the bacterium remains an open topic, but it is likely that infection is usually acquired at a young age, particularly where lower socio-economic conditions prevail. Transmission via an external source such as water supply is a possibility but, in general, infection is probably passed from person to person

Can Drinking Water Serve as a Potential Reservoir of

H. pylori infections are typically acquired in childhood and, if confirmed, a vaccine would potentially allow for an H. pylori eradication programme in developing countries, which serve as a major reservoir of the infectio Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease but the precise mode(s) of transmission are unknown. There is no confirmed environmental reservoir other than man, suggesting that transmission is from person to person and faecal-oral, oral-oral, and gastro-oral routes have been implicated. 1 H. pylori infection is common in young children living in poor. INTRODUCTION. H. pylori, the principal species of the genus Helicobacter, is a common human pathogen, which is responsible for a variety of gastroduodenal pathologies in both the developing and the developed world ().It is the main cause of at least 90% of duodenal ulcers and 70% of gastric ulcers ().The bacterium is a slow-growing Gram-negative, curved or S-shaped rod when viewed in vivo. H pylori transmission is still not completely understood. In addition, among infected patients, the reasons why only some develop symptoms is still a matter of speculations. Studies suggested that H.pylori is also transmitted from domestic animals like cat and sheep, but humans are the primary reservoir of H pylori infection [7, 8]

Are tonsils a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori infection

The oral cavity may serve as a reservoir of Helicobacter pylori. However, the factors required for H. pylori colonization are unknown. Here, we analyzed the relationship between the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and that of major periodontopathic bacterial species. Nested PCR was performed to detect H. pylori and these bacterial species in specimens of saliva, dental plaque, and. Dental plaque has been reported to be a reservoir for H. pylori. 6 Some authors have found H. pylori to be part of the normal flora in the mouth, 7 while others feel more studies are needed to. Awareness of the spiral gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori is little more than a decade old. Yet much has been learned about its epidemiology, its role in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer, and the treatment of the infection (panel). This knowledge however, is not applied by all who should use it Helicobacter pylori causes a wide range of human diseases including cancer. Carcinogenic foodborne trematodes Opisthorchis viverrini, Clonorchis sinensis, and O. felineus might promote. Results & Conclusions: In gastric samples, non-pylori helicobacter spp., have been observed.87.5% of samples were positive for urease test. In light microscopic studies (we observed some spiral gram negative bacteria with 2-7 coils), 80% of samples were positive. Therefore the prevalence of helicobacter can vary from 80 to 87.5% in stray dogs

GASTROINTESTINAL AND LIVER HISTOLOGY PATHOLOGY ATLAS(PDF) The Association Of Dental Plaque And HelicobacterPPT - Gastrites, H pylori , ulcères gastroduodénauxMycobacterium tuberculosis - Microbiology - Medbullets Step 1

Reservoir bugs: Study shows why stomach pathogen is so

Citation: Ali Bahadori , [Assessment of non-pylori helicobacter species in stray dog's stomach as a potential reservoir for human infections], Med. J. Tabriz Univ. Med. Sci. Health Serv. 2016; 38 (3): 26-3 H. pylori is a gram-negative, motile, microaerophilic, and spiral shape bacterium [].The only natural reservoir of H. pylori is the human stomach []. H. pylori infection usually occurs in childhood and remains in the host's life without antimicrobial treatment [].The bacterium can be transmitted by person to person transmission by the oral-oral or fecal-oral route [] Helicobacter pylori is a curved microaerophilic Gram‐negative bacterium considered as a risk factor for gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to find an association between burning sensations, acid taste, halitosis, and lingual hyperplasia with the effect of H. pylori on the mouth. Materials and Methods

Campylobacter & helicobacter dr

Helicobacter pylori is a human-associated bacterium, colonizing the stomach. It is estimated that H. pylori infection affects more than half of the adult population worldwide and it is a causative agent of chronic gastritis, having a major role in promoting the development of peptic ulcer disease and non-cardia adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Wide variations in the prevalence and incidence. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) Considering oral cavity is a potential extragastric reservoir for H. pylori and may be source of infection, re-infection and transmission , researchers also made efforts to explore the association between H.pylori infection and oral diseases Dental plaque in adult patients is well identified as a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori. This question still remains unclear in children. The aim of this study is to identify the presence of this bacterium in dental plaque of Mexican pediatric patients, using Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). Forty patients from 2 to 11 years without dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled